The Unique Bodily Demands of an Ultramarathon

Ultramarathon pic
Ultramarathon
Image: active.com

Since 1993, Sharyn O’Halloran has been an instructor at Columbia University, where she currently serves as a George Blumenthal professor of political economy. During her free time, Sharyn O’Halloran participates in distance running, and has run multiple ultramarathons.

The ultramarathon, a race exceeding 26.2 miles and often extending as far as 50 or 100 miles, makes unique demands on the body. Ultramarathons cannot be approached like a normal marathon, where runners maintain a reasonably consistent pace throughout, and spend as much as 85 percent of the race at their maximum heart rate. Ultramarathon runners typical spend close to half the race at that level of intensity, but may also walk or hike regularly. The more varied terrain can cause injuries as well, which range from blisters to stress fractures.

The nutrient intake during an ultramarathon route also differs from a conventional marathon. Because these races can last as much as a full waking day, aid stations stock more than just water, sports drinks, and gel. Substantial food such as burgers, burritos, and sandwiches, and even calorie-dense fare like candy and soda, can often be found at these aid stations. Runners rely on both salty and sweet foods as a means of retaining water and rebuilding energy during an ultramarathon.

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The Course of the New York City Marathon

 

New York City Marathon pic
New York City Marathon
Image: tcsnycmarathon.org

An authority on political science, Sharyn O’Halloran serves as a professor at Columbia University. She is both a George Blumenthal Professor of Political Economics and a professor of international and public affairs. Outside of her career, Sharyn O’Halloran is a distance runner who has completed a number of organized races, including the New York City Marathon.

The 48th New York City Marathon took place on November 4, 2018. Long regarded as the standard for marathons in major metropolitan areas around the world, the New York City Marathon traverses all five boroughs of the city.

The 2018 marathon began on Staten Island and finished in Manhattan’s iconic Central Park. Beginning with its most challenging section, the course undergoes a rise in elevation of more than 150 feet as it traverses the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge.

From that point on, the majority of the course becomes relatively flat. However, runners encounter significant climbs near the end of the race as they reach the Queensboro Bridge and traverse downtown Manhattan.

Love and Ruin Reimagines Hemingway’s Spanish Love Story

Ernest Hemingway pic
Ernest Hemingway
Image: biography.com

Columbia University academic Sharyn O’Halloran pursues her research interest in American politics and political methodology as the George Blumenthal Professor of Political Economy. Outside of her work, Sharyn O’Halloran lists reading historical fiction as one of her favorite pastimes.

Love and Ruin is the second novel by historical-fiction writer Paula McLain that centers on Ernest Hemingway’s legendary turbulent relationships. The book begins in the late 1930s in the midst of the Spanish Civil War, where Hemingway and Martha Gellhorn, a journalist and aspiring writer, travel to together to cover the fighting. The novel follows how the bond between the two writers intensifies from platonic friendship to a romantic relationship that eventually becomes Hemingway’s third marriage.

McLain used Gellhorn’s own words, harvested from the famed war correspondent’s personal letters and writings, to tell a fictionalized version of Gellhorn’s affair with the writer. The author describes Gellhorn’s difficulty reconciling her ambitions with the needs of her successful but antagonistic husband after the couple’s move to the idyllic setting of 1940s Havana.

Legal Services Offered by the Legal Action Center

 Legal Action Center pic
Legal Action Center
Image: lac.org

Since 1997, Sharyn O’Halloran has held several professorial positions with Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs. She now serves as the senior vice dean for the university’s School of Professional Studies. Sharyn O’Halloran has been published in a number of academic journals, including the American Journal of Political Science and the Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization. She is an active volunteer with the Legal Action Center based in New York City.

Since 1973, the Legal Action Center (LAC) has provided legal advocacy and representation for people facing discrimination due to their HIV/AIDS status, criminal record, or addiction. In addition to creating education programs for policymakers and developing research projects that analyze the impact of public policies, the LAC offers direct services to its clients.

The LAC provides representation and legal counsel free of charge to New Yorkers who are illegally barred from accessing housing and employment or denied other rights. Some of its services include filing complaints of discrimination with the appropriate agency and appealing denials for occupational licenses or public housing due to the applicant’s criminal history.

The New York Road Runners Five-Borough Series

NYRR pic
NYRR
Image: NYRR.org

The recipient of a bachelor’s degree in economics and political science from the University of California San Diego, Sharyn O’Halloran is an experienced professor who has taught at Columbia University since 1993. An avid runner, Sharyn O’Halloran has completed all five races of the New York Road Runners’ (NYRR) Five-Borough Series.

The Five-Borough Series is comprised of the United Airlines NYC Half, the Popular Brooklyn Half, the NYRR Queens 10K, the New Balance Bronx 10 Mile, and the NYRR Staten Island Half. The 2019 series begins on March 19 with the half marathon in New York City. The half marathon begins in Brooklyn before moving across the Manhattan Bridge, through Times Square, and concluding in Central Park. The dates for the other four runs have yet to be determined, but participants can expect to run past iconic New York sights, such as Coney Island’s boardwalk, Yankee Stadium, and Flushing Meadows Corona Park.

The last of the five runs is the NYRR Staten Island Half, which celebrates what’s special and unique about the community as participants run through a course overlooking the New York Harbor and the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge. The half marathon also serves as an ideal tune-up race for the 2019 TCS New York City Marathon.

NYRR members who have completed at least four events in 2018 earn automatic entry into the United Airlines NYC Half.

New York Appleseed Celebrates the Passing of the D15 Diversity Plan

New York Appleseed pic
New York Appleseed
Image: nyappleseed.org

Drawing upon 25 years of experience, Sharyn O’Halloran is a professor of political economics at Columbia University. She is also an author whose work has earned her awards and grants from the National Science Foundation, Hoover Institution, and Russell Sage Foundation. Sharyn O’Halloran’s educational pursuits extend to the nonprofit sector, as she is a supporter of New York Appleseed, an organization that advocates for more diverse schools and communities throughout the state.

This past September, Appleseed representatives stood with New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and other city officials as they announced the approval of a plan to encourage and facilitate an increase in diversity at 11 middle schools in Brooklyn’s Community School District 15. Prior to the approval of the community-driven plan, District 15 was a choice school district, which meant none of its schools served a specific geographical area; 10 of the 11 schools utilized a screened admissions method that favored privileged students.

However, the new desegregation plan includes a proposal to remove academic-based screening from each of those middle schools and a measure to set aside 52 percent of enrollment to children from low-income families, as well as those learning to speak English. De Blasio also announced the City was putting aside an additional $2 million to launch similar desegregation programs in other districts.

The EPSA and Its Annual Conference Promote Political Science

European Political Science Association pic
European Political Science Association
Image: epsanet.org

An experienced political science and public affairs professional, Sharyn O’Halloran serves as the George Blumenthal Professor of Political Economics at Columbia University. Possessing more than two decades of experience, Sharyn O’Halloran has authored dozens of publications and spoken at numerous conferences, including the European Political Science Association (EPSA) Conference.

Founded in 2010, the EPSA promotes political science in Europe, fosters the development of postgraduate training for political science professionals, and supports international networking among political scientists. In addition, the organization publishes a journal called Political Science Research and Methods.

EPSA hosts an annual conference for political scientists, the first held in Dublin, Ireland, in 2011. Since its founding, the annual conference has been held in various cities throughout Europe, including Barcelona and Berlin. The most recent was in Vienna, Austria, in June. At the event, attendees were given opportunities to discuss their work, network with other professionals, and enjoy the city.